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Anonymous Reviews

I believe it is time for Booking.Com to stop allowing anonymous reviews. How do they help anyone improve a property? It is impossible to identify, what the guests is referring to in their complaint. I don't believe I have ever seen an anonymous review rate a property 100%. If a complaint or poor review is warranted so be it, but things can only be improved when a manager/owner can identify what the complainant is complaining about, whether it be a staff member or a problem within the property/room. 

If enough of us request this change, surely it should happen. 

If you have an opinion, and want to share it, you should be man/woman enough to put your name to it. 

Submitted by Malcolm Craig

  

128 Replies

1
Kathleen Davenhall

Hello Malcolm - we have had several anonymous reviews that gave us 100% in the last 6 months so it is possible - it may be that some guests do not wish recognition or publicity which can be world wide with booking.com

Submitted by Kath Davenhall

1 year ago
1
Holidae House

We have to agree with Malcolm. While we also agree with Kath - we also receive many anonymous 100% reviews - we also receive anonymous reviews that are not 100%. As Malcolm points out, how does this help? So you were cold, a legitimate complaint and one we want to address. Was the radiator set too low, was the wind chill -35 degrees, was it a freak cold night in early October? If we don't know when you were here we cannot address your concerns. And if you are leaving a negative comment we assume you WANT us to address your concern. Kath makes a good point that people may not want to be identified to the world, but if that is the case let them send a private email to the owner/manager. We fail to see a sufficient amount of benefit that justifies anonymous reviews.

+1
1 year ago
1
Colin Whittaker

I agree with Malcolm but would also go further in not allowing customers to give negative star ratings without explaining why.

We have had on one occasion a comfort rating of 7.5, but with no explanation of what the issue was how does this help? Most other guests have given a 10-star rating so there isn't even a pattern for issues with negative comfort issues so no idea what the issue was.

I would also like to make a note that I feel that Booking.com customers have more negative reviews that other well-known companies customers, so what type of customers are you attracting Booking.com?

1 year ago
1
Stephen Cresswell

I believe if you are not prepared to give your identity, if not to the general public than at least to the proprietors then you should not have the right to go public to the entire world. I say this after receiving many 10's from customers so it's not sour grapes just a principal I believe in.

+2
1 year ago
1
Kathleen Davenhall

Hello Colin - Just to let you know we have experience of other holiday letting agencies since 1994 - the reviews from the other agencies were much fewer than booking.com although the comments were about the same the review score was on the whole lower than booking.com.

The higher review score is important to us and it definitely influences customers looking to book

The guests with other agencies were only from the UK whilst booking.com attracts overseas guests so increasing the occupancy

So we know for a fact that booking.com has huge strength in the tourist business that cannot be found in other agencies

Regards Kath

1 year ago
1
Ron Hunter

Hello all

Yes, we support the move to remove anonymous reviews without comment as an option.

Yes, we have had a number of 10's written anonymously without comment, including one received overnight. However, we have also received them with a score of around 5, and they are unhelpful and quite frustrating to someone that only wants to be responsive and helpful.

These reviews are of no value whatsoever to the people that count - the author we cannot apologise too or compensate, potential future guests we cannot protect from the same problem, and nor are they of any value to the property that is left completely in the dark.

We have no idea why booking.com can consider them being in any way beneficial, but hopefully this is being read by the right people to move us forward positively.

Rgds, Ron

+2
1 year ago
1
malcolm craig

Thanks to all of you that have agreed that anonymous reviews benefit no one. Certainly they can't help a property improve.

Booking.com is proactive in its research and is in the forefront with on line visibility, However it is slow to react to any type of request to change things.

Maybe next time we complete a survey that they keep asking to complete at the end, were they say, "If you had 5 minutes with the General Manager, what would you say?"

We should all ask that anonymous reviews be stopped. Regards Malcolm Craig

+1
1 year ago
1
Chris Scregg

Yes removing the anonymous option will ultimately benefit guests as owners/managers may be able to take action, knowing the guest and therefore which room, servive or staff member may need attention.

1 year ago
1
Annie Brain

I must add my voice to agree with Malcolm on all counts. I have just started in this business and so far had very favourable ratings and reviews from, for the most part, wonderful guests. I have had a couple of lower ratings which have left me in the dark and guessing what the problem was, resulting in quite a bit of worry.

Booking.com have brought me a lot of business and guided me through the system so its hard to fault them, however on the anonymous option I do feel this needs to be stopped. When you put a lot of effort into your business (I only have a couple of rooms) its important that the guests feel happy.

I also agree with Stephen's comment, this is not sour grapes .......

1 year ago
3
christine

Anon doesn't bother me as much as the fact that we cannot respond to a review if the guest didn't write any words. It then doesn't show up as a review on their site. I should at least be able to reply 'Thank you!"

+1
1 year ago
1
John Collins

I raised this concern with Booking.com earlier this week. An Anonymous Review does not provide constructive criticism to Hoteliers, it's just a worthless number that we are held accountable to. We aren't able to see when the anonymous Guest stayed so I can't tell which staff were working and need further training, we can't tell where they stayed so I don't know which room or area needs addressing, we don't have any information provided to grow and learn and adapt from the review, yet the review is there and we have to take note of it.

+1
1 year ago
2
Wayne Cahoon

Did John Collins write my response? It states exactly what I was going to write.

1 year ago
2
Wayne Cahoon

Did John Collins write my response? It states exactly what I was going to write.

Whoops, I backed up my browser and seen that this post was not sent yet so I resent it. Low and behold it was already sent. Sorry for the duplication.... Wayne

1 year ago
5
Brooke
Hi everyone,
Great to see such a big conversation happening around guest reviews.
A few things I thought might be helpful to share with everyone. Booking.com gives guests the possibility to sign their review, to choose a nickname or to remain anonymous due to privacy protection. While we are legally bound to allow users to remain anonymous, we are looking into ways to make this feedback more actionable for you in the future.
Thank you for all your great feedback, looking forward to seeing more posts!
-Brooke
1 year ago
2
Wayne Cahoon

Brooke, You stated "legally bound to allow users to remain anonymous", great do that, BUT make it anonymous to other viewers of your website, NOT anonymous to us when we already have their name, address and credit card info on file is not right. Give us something we can use like the room #/name, the date they stayed, their booking or confirmation #.

If you had spinach on your teeth wouldn't you want someone to tell you so you can correct the problem right then? Our would you prefer to get an anonymous message a week later that told you of the issue, but not when or where it happened? If you knew right away you could have done something immediately to correct the issue. Afterwards when you see the photos from that wedding with spinach on your teeth, how would you fell then? Timely corrections can solve a problem before it becomes a disaster.

We just want the same courtesy you would want if we get caught with spinach on our teeth.

Wayne

1 year ago
1
Ron Hunter

Suggestion. Remove the Anonymous option - there is no Law that says you have to offer that to our guests.

1 year ago
1
Stephen Cresswell

If guests want to stay anonymous to the public then that's fine but we proprietors should have the the facility of knowing. If you sign up to other online review sites such as Trust Pilot, your name is published and quite right too.

1 year ago
1
malcolm craig

I really want to respond to Brooke from the Communities Team. You mention in your comment about the importance of privacy protection for guests.

A simply statement by Booking.com on the review page stating, "If you want to remain Anonymous, that's fine, however, your review will only go to the property and will not be seen by the public.

If you want your review published your review must show at least your first name plus your Booking number."

That covers the privacy act.

A booking number allows the property to identify and fix a problem, or to personally thank a reviewer for taking the time to do the review.

I further believe only published reviews, with a name and booking number, should count towards a properties review score.

Brooke, properties need protection as well as guests.

I received an email yesterday from another property, warning that a local real estate agent was writing poor reviews, scoring 2/10, on review sites about properties were the managers held their own real estate licenses,

It was noticed because in one she mistakenly used her own name.

When questioned she admitted to having never stayed at the property, but because the owner held a full license, he was potentially costing her sales.

1 year ago
2
Adam Williams

I'd settle for them ceasing to publish blatently libellous reviews. We had a guy who gave us a 10/10 on our own check-in software when he arrived, then during the stay in conversation described everything as "fantastic".

Then his bike got stolen from NEAR the premises because he didn't chain it up. Of course that's all our fault isn't it, and despite bending over backwards to try and help him, we got a 2.5/10 review on booking.com (Anonymous of course). So evidently the theft of the bike somehow affected the cleanliness and facilities of our premises?

Booking.com wouldn't remove the review, despite being able to prove it was false, and the actual incident was completely out of our control. And it took them over a week to publish my response to his review (luckily he left some comments so I could actually respond!) whereas his initial review was up in minutes after the final conversation I had with him.

1 year ago
2
Wayne Cahoon

I wrote a response to Brooke a day ago and it hasn't been published yet, however, many more have sent their responses in and I see they're published. Why is this?

1 year ago
5
Brooke

Sorry about the Wayne, there was a glitch in the system.

Thanks for your comments here on the Partner Forum, we really appreciate your advice and feedback.

Looking forward to more posts from you,

-Brooke

1 year ago
1
Alisue

Online presence in this industry is "everything" reviews can either make or break a business!

If a person is not prepared to put their name to a review, comments or otherwise - perfect score or not, then they should not be eligible to have their review published.

There is a simple solution to the problem and the privacy act should not looked at as a barrier of prevention but rather a hurdle to the problem.

1 year ago
1
Apartment St Julians

Definitely agree with all that is being said above. Anonymous reviews should not be allowed (booking.com can always make only booking number or other generic details visible to others to protect their privacy as others suggested) and definitely allow the property to always be able to reply to the review.

May I add another suggestion, I think it is high time that booking.com distinguish listings of small, private properties and guest houses, from that of big hotels, even with regards to review metrics available - why should I be reviewed on 'Staff' when my self-catering apartment is not staffed? I am always in contact with my guests and ready to help with anything or solve any issues, so when I get low scores on Staff its only because there is no reception desk at the property (they even write it as a negative comment sometimes so am quite sure about this). It should actually be clearly displayed on all listings whether there is reception or not, so that guests can opt out of booking accommodations that only offer remote (albeit more personal) support. Another metric I find misleading for smaller properties is 'Facilities' which I suspect some guests understand as being restaurants, spas, gym, and other facilities available only in hotels.

@Adam Williams may I ask what kind of check - in software you use, and if it helps you identify any issues in time to be able to rectify any problems and make your guests happy ? I always ask if everything is OK on their arrival but they will not always say if anything is bothering them.

1 year ago
2
Adam Williams

@Apartment St Julians I don't know if I'm allowed to mention specific products here, but the forum rules don't seem to prohibit it, so...

We use a small tablet device from a company called YourWelcome. It gives them info about the local area, a directory of services such as restaurants nearby etc and you can add extra services like airport pickup and late checkout. You can also add video guides to it, which is really useful for apartments where you probably have a range of appliances people aren't used to using.

Guests can also check in on it, which is handy for any property with a self check-in process as you know when people are arriving. They can rate you out of 5 for their first impressions, and add notes and images to support their rating.

Most people give us 5/5, in which case we give them a night to settle in and then get in touch with them the next day anyway just to confirm everything's OK and see if they need anything, which is always appreciated. One person gave us 3/5 and complained of an issue with the bed linen. This was picked up immediately by someone on my customer service team who contacted the guest straight away and got housekeeping to go out and resolve the issue within about 10 minutes. In the end they were impressed by the response they got late in the evening and it turned a potentially poor experience into a positive.

Well worth it in my opinion but the key is placement of the tablet. We see way more interaction with it in locations where we can display it prominently in the hallway so they see it as soon as they arrive.

Just to be clear btw I don't work for YourWelcome and am not affiliated with them in any way other than the fact that we use them in all our apartments.

1 year ago
2
Paul Chatwin

Another of my favourite topics (lol)

Some of you may have seen myself and my hotel in the National (and International) Press 2 weeks ago. Despite it being given the usual "Basil Fawlty" headline the overwhelming majority backed my opinion on false reviews and the need for a fairer system. The number of emails and offers for radio and TV was insane.

The problem with every review website is that they are not FAIR.

ALL reviews should remain private for 7 days as this allows the business time to monitor reviews across different platforms and to formulate a response (or complaint).

When that 7 days has elapsed, both the review and response should be made public together.

IF the property wishes to object to the review content, the review and complaint should be kept private until a decision has been made by the platform.

IF the property is not happy with the decision, there should be an INDEPENDENT review system - and the property should pay £50 to go down that route - with the platform refunding the property if the complaint is accepted.

NO review should be published without the property being able to identify the author - perhaps the booking ref can be used instead of "anonymous".

What I am now finding is reviewers are getting clever. They leave an anon review but dont put any text description so the property cannot reply. BUT they now put their complaint in the title instead - example "There was evidence of mice in room" or "Owner swore at me and charged me twice" etc.
.

.

.

.

THEN there are the reviews on the platforms which do have a response.

Many platforms dont show the property response and you have to click to see it (if the option exists) - that isnt exactly fair is it.

I just had a look at my mixed bag of reviews on booking.com

It would be great if someone could actually explain this..........

Last 10 Review in Extranet

7.5

6.7

10.0

10.0

9.6

5.8

8.3

7.5

8.3

5.0

BUT if you look at the last 10 in one section of our public page they are;

9.2

8.3

8.3

9.2

8.3

9.2

7.5

9.2

And in another part of the public page;

6.7

5.8

5.0

7.9

10.0

5.8

5.4

7.1

HOW THE HELL can they list our most recent 10 reviews and get them all so wrong on the same platform?

1 year ago
1
Lilydale Z

Reading everything written about anonymous reviews, I told myself "my thoughts EXACTLY." Booking.com should really do something about them. If they are keen enough to protect reviewers privacy, they should equally be keen to protect our businesses from the ill effects of anonymous reviews. Personally, if your concerns are legitimate and not just because you were pissed off you have to be charged for the additional guests you did not include in your original booking, why go anonymous. And as mentioned by one of the comments, let them be anonymous from public viewers but not from us so we could deal with their concerns.

+1
1 year ago
2
Wayne Cahoon

Adam Williams wrote "We use a small tablet device from a company called YourWelcome." Adam can you give the web address for that company? YourWelcome is too general for the search engines to list this company.

1 year ago
1
Lynkerr

I agree we should be able to review the guests and they should not have the choice to be anonymous - and should write why they have chosen the ratings they have listed.

The same room will go from 5 to 10 one day apart; setup exactly the same - this makes no sense and you cannot improve if you don't know which room they are referring to.

Airbnb allows you to rate your guest and to say if you would recommend them to other hosts - why can booking.com do the same?

1 year ago
1
Apartment St Julians

@Adam Williams thank you so much for the detailed information. I really appreciate as technologies like this are quite new to me - I am still contemplating whether to get a channel manager even though I now have 4 apartments and a 5-room guesthouse lol ;) I can see this working especially with the guest house with self check-in, where guests seem to be most bothered by the fact that there is no reception - even though I am available 24/7 by phone or in person if required.

@Paul Chawton I notice that mostly the good review scores are shown when searching the properties, so maybe it is a booking.com strategy to display properties in the best possible light? (or maybe this is just wishful thinking on my side lol, but I do believe that booking.com's main aim is to drive sales to properties (and ultimately themselves) although more inclined to protect guests. Yes I have also noticed that property's responses to reviews are not immediately visible, and you need to click on them to read them, which I guess many do not.

1 year ago
2
Wayne Cahoon

Thanks Adam, Your right about the top of the list, I made two errors, I didn't use the quotes and I had a space between the two words. Novice mistake...

Also I don't use Google, or as little as I can. They track and record every aspect of every search, google maps, every word written in Gmail and Android phones (every contact, phone # and photos linked to phone #'s in that phone) and much much more. There is actually a web page in Google labyrinth of web pages that I was able to see and control how Google records what they record for all my activities using Google products. It was scary to see how far their tentacles reach. I use DuckDuckGo.com for my search engine now. Y

Google’s CEO, Eric Schmidt, went on the record saying: “If you have something that you don’t want anyone to know, maybe you shouldn’t be doing it in the first place.”

Don't believe me, search the web yourself or read: http://royal.pingdom.com/2010/01/08/how-google-collects-data-about-you-and-the-internet/

1 year ago
2
Dmitriy Bolobolov

Hi everyone!

I'd like to add some points regarding reviews and share my story. Unfortunately, it is a huge problem for private apartment's listings. I agree that as an owner I can not do business without making some mistakes and always hail constructive criticism from guests. It helps to operate in a better way. However, anonymous and reviews without comments or just untrue reviews could be very destructive for small businesses. I disagree with Booking.com position on this issue at all. They do nothing with this out of date review system just hiding under their one-sided policy. I wonder why when you can prove that there is lie in the review they ignore it? Review Team even agree that guests can put any lie in the review and it will be published if it does not breach policy! Where is the common sense?

When I got untrue review (I gave them evidence) last year Booking.com refused to delete it because it was not against their policy which is actually very easy to follow. I even asked CEO to look into my case - she did but nothing had happened - the review was not deleted. One of Booking.com manager wrote to me: "If you want the review to be removed, then you require to terminate the agreement, after which the review will be gone forever." The problem was that my ranking dropped dramatically after that review was published as well as reviews score - from 9.8 to 9.1. Needless to say, I started to lose bookings, some guests cancelled their reservations because of its context. The only I could do was to respond to it which is absolutely unfair in case of untrue review. Responding just share your side of the story and does not affect the review score as well as ranking.

This case showed me that nevertheless we are paying commission and gain income for the company, travellers have more rights here and Booking.com value them much higher than us. Maybe it's time for them to pay commission instead of us?:) Also I clearly understand that there is absolutely no sense in contacting Review Team - all you can receive from them is "copy/paste" robotics response sometimes with rather rude comments.

Have anyone had a successful case of deleting untrue review here? Also I would highly appreciate some examples or TIP how you dealt with similar cases.

In my email to CEO I suggested some changes for the Review Policy:
1. Allow to delete defamatory, untrue, offensive, fraudulent reviews even if they don’t breach writing rules.
2. Stop providing access to Booking.com services for the guests who published such reviews.
3. Owners of all accommodations should have to say their opinion about their guests in the reviews and this reviews must be visible to all. It means that all guests should be reviewed and have their own rating.
4. Owners and the guests must be able to see other reviews left by particular guest to have wider information.
5. Based on guests previous behaviour (from reviews) owners must have ability to decide if they want to host the guests. For example there will be 24 hours for the decision.
6. Stop providing access to Booking.com services for the owners who published defamatory, untrue reviews of their guests.

Decided to add 7. The review must contain only experience regarding the property/hotel not about the street, city, parking, pub, country etc. This is a ridiculous comment on property - parking was very expensive. I don't have my own parking but of course it is my fault that Council decided to set up such prices in the centre and that's why I should get 6.2.

I think we can change the situation if make the issue visible to Booking.com CEO again. But the letter should be sign with a huge number of us. Now the company unfortunately sees no problem.

I've seen many posts about review's issues here but they are not in one place. How to make separate topic "Reviews"?

P.S. I know how great the review system works on another well known online platform. Moreover on that platform review team always try to help with such type of review and delete them if you can prove your statement.

Thanks!

Dmitriy Bolobolov

1 year ago
2
Wayne Cahoon

Wow Dmitriy, That was very thoughtful and well written so I could see your point of view clearly. I hadn't been on the other end of a very bad/poor review yet, but I hope Booking.com does fix this issue before I get whacked hard.

I can imagine it'll take a lot of work to make it right building a new review process into the website, HOWEVER, Booking.com can take immediate action by pulling bad reviews and contacting the establishment to get their side of the story. Then Booking/com can be the arbitrators as to what is appropriate to publish to their site.

Everyone in the U.S. has the right to confront their accuser in a court of law. Our local papers won't publish an editorial or a response anonymously. If I go to a town meeting I have to state my name and address before I speak. This is done to protect the accused of false witness and to keep a record of whom is saying what.

I think Booking.com should change their policy to allow the Hotelier the ability to dispute a review.

1 year ago
1
Myperpignan

It serves no purpose to have anonymous reviews positive of negative. Theres no point. They do not in any way educate the owners / managers or other guests. But it is a way for booking to attract more reviews for their own site. We have had excellent anonymous reviews and some that were clearly by jealous people who seek to damage our business. It is expected but not appreciated. And as I said serves no purpose. But we can argue all day here it falls on deaf ears. It would be nice to have in the settings on the extranet the ability to disallow anonymous reviews. Letting the hotel decide. It is after all their property.

1 year ago
1
Umbiroo

I fully support everyone who urged booking.com to end anonymous reviews, as they serve no useful purpose to neither the host nor to booking.com itself. As a new establishment my very first review was 9.6 then I had two separate couples whom if I had a choice wouldn't have accommodated in the first instance. The first couple left with stolen property and did not bother to checkout I only received a message that the keys were left in the door. After threatening them with reporting the theft to the police they acknowledged the unauthorized removal of items and promised to return them, but I have not yet received the items. The next couple was just racist as soon as I introduced myself as the owner. The next thing I heard from them was to come to the self catering unit and clean the dust under the bed...who does that! looking under the bed for what? If that was not enough when the staff was there to do what they wanted to be done racist remarks were made. A few days after they departure I received an anonymous overall rating of 2.5 for each and every item, even for the location without any comment. In my opinion the ratings were absurd, malicious and devoid of any credibility. The area where my establishment is located is adjacent to the Strand Hotel at the main beach and is rated as the best in Swakopmund and has a constant rating of 10 by honest, decent guests. My question to booking.com is...I as the host am I allowed to disclose the names of these dishonest and racist guests on this platform as a warning to other hosts?

1 year ago
1
Myperpignan

When a guest rates all your services 2.5 the only explanation is that they wish to work with bookings platform as it stands and use it to attempt to damage your reputation. They do this with the total support and encouragement of booking. You should be aware of this, if booking wanted to change this they would. They perceive the attempted destruction of your hard earned position as entertainment. And only cowards leave anonymous reviews. It’s a negative destructive process that is supported by booking.

1 year ago
1
Myperpignan

I once had a review where the guest reviewed booking in a rather poor light. They were not happy with the booking process. I did not report it. This review was removed entirely by booking. I took a screen shot of it. So still have a copy. But it’s fair to say when booking is placed in the same position as us they delete the offending review very quickly. While tellinging us that they can not delete reviews about hosts. Interesting

1 year ago
2
Kenata

Exactly! Anonymous review should be just that - if people aren't prepared to put their name to something they should NOT be allowed to have it publicly displayed.

We have had three anonymous reviews recently -two gave us 10 for everything and one gave us 7.5 for everything with no idea why the 7.5 when others thought it was 10 or who it was? Very annoying and confusing.

1 year ago
1
Info

I really hope that Booking.com do something about this anonymous review capability as it is obviously a BIG issue for us hoteliers.

There is no such thing as anonymous , there is a person behind that decision and if they are not able or want to leave their name , so be it BUT the Hotelier is entitled to know the details of the complainant. And I say complainant as thats what the issue is , people giving reviews of 10/10 obviously just dont want their name published with their comments , if any , but those that write a negative review have an ulterior motive.

I have experienced with Booking.com that they will not remove a bad review even if you point out that the review is malicious...Why .I believe because nobody has been empowered to assess the situation. Its time they got with the real world and realised that there is more that one customer in their books.. The Hoteliers are supposedly a PARTNER / Customer of Booking.com and but I do not believe we are accorded that status.

A further suggestion to assist in smoothing the effect of review stats as it is based on a revolving 24 month assessment is to remove the highest and lowest score which takes the exceptions out of the calculations and therefor improve your average rating status. Just a suggestion. It happens in other large corporate business in many facets like performance reviews , sales etc.

1 year ago
2
Marshrose

Anonymous reviews are ungrounded, unverified and the fact that they are anonymous is sufficient grounds to question the integrity of the review. Booking.com is not looking after its partners by not giving them the opportunity to respond, or know the source or reason for a perceived negativity which may be a sour taste left in the guests mouth due to an unrelated incident during their holiday, maybe not even on the premises. REMOVE the anonymous option, if you are not going to give the guesthouse the option to respond to it

1 year ago
1
Jmarooday

Totally agree with Malcolm on the issue. I had a totally unfair anonymous review. Something needs to be done.

1 year ago
2
Kenata

Brooke from the Communities team glibly brushed off our concerns about anonymous review with

"we are legally bound to allow users to remain anonymous".

This is nonsense.

I wonder how Brooke would like it if we were all to write anonymous reviews about her work while allowing her no right of reply.

In law, if someone accuse you of a crime they have to identify themselves.

Booking.com allows people to rate their host unchallenged under the bogus 'anonymous' label and what is even worse, there is no opportunity for the victim(the host) to reply.

Quite simply booking.com should not allow anonymous reviews or if it does allow it then these reviews should not be published publicly without a right of reply from the host.

Anonymous reviews can be deliberately damaging at worst and are confusing at best.

Booking.com seems to have forgotten thy are supposed to be "partnering" the hosts and that there are two sides to every story.

1 year ago
2
Marshrose

Anonymous reviews are damaging to both the guest house and to booking.com who are supposed to be partnering with the service provider, making their income from the same source. the hotelier is doing all the HARD work in creating the platform from which booking.com derives its income. the least they could do is stand by and assist the hotelier. the purpose of a review should be a positive one, like constructive criticism. the negative, anonymous is simply a damning blow without any proof or justification. if it was genuine constructive, the critic would be open to a courtesy call and a follow up on remedy. it leaves the platform open for opposition hoteliers to even book in for short stay, check out their opposition and slam them with a bad review afterwards! this is not a fair business platform and Booking.com needs to change their policy. there is NO LEGAL OBLIGATION to take anonymous reviews, and if reviews can only be posted by actual past guests, they should be able to identify who has placed the review or REMOVE THE ANONYMOUS OPTION. it is only selected because it is offered. if you cant prove who submitted the review booking.com, remove it! how do we know it is not one of your staff playing favour between subscribers and knocking them down just when they have a nice list of good reviews? you place yourselves under question with your policy and could be guilty from inhouse. i have for instance checked all my guests that could have potentially posted a low rating and ALL were extremely happy and spoke highly of their stay, so where does the 2.5 come from booking.com??? are you trying to balance the tables yourselves by knocking back anyone that rises up??? REMOVE THE ANONYMOUS OPTION NOW

1 year ago
1
Myperpignan

I think you will find our growing list of complaints falling on deaf ears. The issue as i see it is to compete with tripadvisor and others. They want to have the most reviews at their site at all cost. One way to do this is to be open to as many reviews as possible. Even if this system damages partners. Its dysfunctional. Not helpful. Disrespectful toward partners and unjustified. This they know, but change nothing. We have had 2.5 reviews which was a 2.5 for everything from cleaning to wifi which is just not accurate. It is an obvious desire to, with the assistance and guidance of this site, degrade a partner listing. As I have stated before. We have seen a review left by a guest that was very negative toward booking. I saved a screen shot. I said nothing. But on the same day it was magically deleted. One rule for partners and another for booking.

1 year ago
2
Marshrose

Indeed i have also had 2.5 but my others range 8-10. how can that be for the same service??? furthermore, the review was posted in Jan. i have followed up all my Jan guests, all were ecstatic about service and said they had not posted the review. In fact i have an in house review form they complete for me manually before they leave, and this does not match up either. if only booked guests can post reviews, this leaves booking,com guilty of meddling. and they hide behind the anonymous thing??! this is ridiculous. they are damaging partners. so what is the ulterior motive. or are there partner owners of booking.com that want to control the market to their own benefit. in that case, we should all remove ourselves from booking.com as they will do us more harm than good. better no reviews and no presence on a website that does you harm!!! booking.com you are the least user friendly to owners already. now this. are you going to do anything about it, or are you proving that you have other motives in breaking down a percentage of the industry?? your consultants answers are very glib and pre orchestrated when one calls in to query the matter. this is a set up surely??

1 year ago
2
Kenata

Another three anonymous reviews this month:

one all 10s with no comments, very nice but I would like to thank them.

one 7.5 for everything with no comments- 7.5 for everything? No comments about what is wrong?

and then another one 7.5 for (again - same for everyhting?) yet this time saying they loved our spacious apartments but there was a leaky shower.

Now as nothing was mentioned to us while they were there and we are available at all times and even have an on-site office this is very annoying.

It was also not mentioned on any of the forms we give guests to complete when they leave. On these forms we ask if there is anything we need to attend to for the next guest.

Also as the review is 'anonymous' we don't even know which apartment or which shower they mean. What exactly was their problem and how bad was it ? Shower head/tap/hot or cold/floor ???

Beyond frustrating!

If anyone from booking.com reads this please forward to someone higher up and ask them how they would feel if this was their property and this happened to them

Anonymous reviews are an insult and must be stopped.

1 year ago
1
Drchanaye

I strongly agree that customers, giving review, should not be allowed to vote anonymously, giving no reasons of complaints. Where is the point?

1 year ago
2
Marshrose

we also have no guarantee that B.com themselves are playing the tables to suit their favourites because they can hide behind the anonymous. BOOKING.COM YOU ARE LEGALLY OBLIGED TO PROVE TO THE HOTELIERS THAT YOU HAVE A GENUINE COMPLAINT AND TO VERIFY IT, OR STOP THE ANONYMOUS THING WHICH IS ONE SIDED AND NOT TRUSTWORTHY AT ALL. YOU ARE NOT PLAYING FAIR. THIS IS FOUL

1 year ago
2
Adam Williams

They don't care about the legalities unfortunately. We've had a 100% libellous (illegal) review as per Defamation Act 2013 and they refused to remove it. What's more, although the review itself went up within minutes of the guest's checkout time, it took them a week to approve our response.

1 year ago
2
Marshrose

Problem is you cant respond to Anonymous!! perhaps we should can B.com

1 year ago